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at 9:15, the impact of new leadership in china on u.s. relations. president obama traveling in parts of asia. we will have those segments, plus, we will take a look at the papers and take your phone calls as well "washington journal ."shington, we will see you then. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> next, a discussion on the future of u.s. diplomacy. after that, a forum on the effectiveness of al-qaeda in yemen. >> a former state department officials from the obama and george w. bush administration's discuss public diplomacy in a tough budget in vermont. the discuss the effectiveness of student exchange programs and government-backed broadcasting outlets, like "voice of america." the george washington school of international affairs hosted this event tuesday. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> that is public diplomacy in action. [laughter] i'm a professor here at gw and the director of the institute for public policy and global communication. you can find us on twitter @ip dgc. we're also on fa
of their force projection in the persian gulf into that conflict. i think there is hope that the u.s.-israel relationship is strong and open enough and the lines of communication are open up that it would not happen. one of the other things that if it may give a little positivity towards that is a concern that the nuclear facilities are so far in the ground that israel does not producing a satisfactory assault. they would need u.s. plant emissions to carry some of those weapons. perhaps that might give some hope there would be communication, if there is an attack down the line, that the two countries would be to work together and cordray. host: 3 more, go to foreignpolicy.com. thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you for having me. host: that does it for today. we will be back live tomorrow morning but lawmakers make their way back for the lame-duck session that begins today. we will be up there taking your calls and your comments and questions. thank you for watching today. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satel
to u.s. leaders negotiating over the so- called fiscal cliff about the serious financial impact looming on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, in the financial times -- to tell little bit more about ben bernanke's , and sister day we turn to david clarke of "politico," their financial services editor. thanks for joining us. guest: thanks for having me. host: what is making the most waves from his speech? guest: in the past he has warned that congress and the president's path to take care of the fiscal cliff. yesterday he said it is not simply doing it but how they
with five u.s. airlines including alaska, american, delta, united and u.s. airways, we anticipate the t.s.a. precheck will be in 35 airports by the end of the year with b.w.i., san francisco, and orlando airports all coming online this week. an additional airlines will be coming onboard >> all of this briefing in our c-span networks. we'll take you live to the white house for the briefing with jay carney. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. thanks for being here. i have a brief statement to read at the top which is that today the president was able to continue returning messages of congratulations from his counterparts around the world. each call he thadged his counterpart for their friend -- thanked his counterpart for their friendship and expressed his desire for close cooperation moving ahead. the president spoke with president karzai of afghanistan, the prime minister of italy, the king of joshedian -- jordan, qatar, president putin of russia, and the president of spain. with that i'll take your questions. >> a couple questions about the scandal that many of us are now covering
performed by national captioning institute] >> the u.s. house gavels in to begin their first bit of legislative work starting the lame duck session, four bills including on asthma inhalers and gavel back out when they finish to return for votes at 6:30 and we expect them to swear in a number of members filling out the remainder of terms for the 112th congress. we expect those to happen during the upcoming votes at 6:30 this evening. the senate also in session today and they have been dealing with a bill drk working on rules to federal land to federal hunting and fishing and the house and senate committees getting under way this week. the intelligence committees in particular off the floor, the intelligence committee of the senate and the house will be meeting in closed session to look at the attack in libya in benghazi this week. tomorrow on c-span 3, we will be covering a hearing looking at the meningitis outbreak. that is tomorrow morning at 10:00 eastern, c-span 3. the president will be hosting a news conference. we do not know the time of the news conference yet. this will be
about taxes, u.s. economic policy. but that was about taxes and the electoral campaign. now we had elections and the taxes are at the center of a very important political debate and at the center of negotiations between the obama administration and congress, particularly the republican controlled house. as i watched the president during his recent press conference and listened to leaders of the house, i think everybody agrees it would be highly desirable to reach a compromise. they also agree the elections provided a mandate. the president seems to think that he is the one who got the mandate and that republicans are saying, well, yes, mr. president, but me, too. and how do you reconcile two mandates and reach an agreement? what are the consequences of failing to do so? this is one of the most important issues facing the administration, the congress, and the nation. mr. norquist. >> several months ago i said there are two options for after the election. after the election, if romney was elected, he would have republican senate to go along with the house. they would pass the ryan pl
commander, jewish war veterans of the u.s.a. charles sasino jr., national commander, american ex-prisoners of war. leo haley, national commander, catholic war veterans of the u.s.a. william meeks, secretary, vietnam veterans of america. john hamilton, commander in chief, veterans of foreign wars of the united states. cleve gear, national commander aamvets. samuel hunt, national president, blinded veterans association. john cahill, national commander, army and navy union of the u.s.a. h. gene overstreet, national commander, noncommissioned officers. james kutz, national commander, the american legion. bruce mckenty, national commander, military order of the purple heart of the u.s.a. mark kilgore, national president, fleet reserve association. james tuey, national commandant, marine corps league. edward brogan, national president military chaplin association. bill lawson, national president, paralyzed veterans of america. benny atkins, national commander, legion of valor of the u.s.a. gary angen, commander in chief, military order of the world wars. jack clemp, president, national
clear yesterday that he is open to new ideas. the u.s. cannot afford tax cuts that were passed 10 years ago -- over 10 years ago now. he feels that the most fair way to pick our revenue shortfall is by raising revenue from the very top. >> explained to everyone, if you can. under balsams and, it was predicted that we have -- bowl es-simpson, it was predicted that we would have 16 trillion dollars. even if you have that, why is that ok to have 22 trillion dollars of debt at in 10 years? by the is that considered still a good thing to do? -- why is that considered still a good thing to do it? >> the best capacity is the size of the debt relative to the economy. what the president has proposed is to put us on a path where the debt is stabilized and we are coming down relative to gdp. >> it is still 100% of gdp. >> i would explain a little bit about the numbers. that is the 16 trillion dollar figure that you mentioned earlier. i do nothing that is inappropriate way of measuring our debt. it is not the measure of that that is economic relevant. >> ten or 12? >> closer to 12. >> ok. the unemp
and now that is not going to happen. we will still have u.s. troops in afghanistan one year from now two years from now, five years from now. where is the press? obviously, these are not issues that the people who run on these programs today -- >> why not? >> because they do not draw an audience. what draws an audience is charlie sheen. what draws an audience is people yelling at each other. it is not enough to say these issues are important. if we actually -- i know it sounds totally idealistic, but when you and i became journalists as young men, we actually believed that we were entering, really, a special, chosen profession that meant something to a democracy. >> we called it a calling. >> a calling, exactly. >> exactly. word of honor, i never thought i was going to get rich as a journalist. you do not go into journalism to become wealthy. >> the changes we are talking about, you have already touched upon the affect it has on our society, on the business itself. value systems change. i am not saying we can ever return to the good old days. that is done, but what worries me is whether
about where the u.s. didn't -- where the u.s. student -- we never had a conservative actor -- a concerted effort of a ranking system. the report does. it is almost entirely prestige and important. in its judgments as opposed to outcomes. we need to think more about how to deal with this problem. the public university has the system of accountability. but that is not everybody, of course. it's caught some way so we're trying to adjust its. but how to half in place incentives systems to focus on outputs is a big deal. during the brief period of time, i joined with the presidents at columbia and stanford. he understood exactly how distorted that rating system was. but then several days later the people told him how much that issue generated in terms of profits and if he wanted to stay its editor, he better leave it alone. >> here again, the role of the president comes in. he was very disturbed because the u.s. rankings were falling. day asked him to go out and drum up more applicants so the universe would look more selective. he said to them, i'm not going to go to rural areas
there versus the u.s.? caller: i was looking at a place in a number of places in the philippines a friend of mine i'm a veteran and talk to other vets and he has a very nice small apartment right across the street from the beach and it's $150 a month. host: do you get a military pension? caller: no, i don't. i just missed. host: host: we're looking at twitter page. back to our calls in memphis. how is the economy affecting your retirement plans? caller: the economy is affecting my retirement plans. when the -- before the market crashed i had mutual fund and a stock in a couple of different companies. as the economy tanked even more i was one of the people who was without employment. i was able to draw unemployment and so i was able to have that until i received another job which was at a greater pay cut. now at this point trying to go back to school, trying to get my mutual funds back together because i did cash one of them out. my ira is together. i never rolled my 401-k over either. at this point trying to go back to school, trying to live on less money, downgrading all the way, having
- door hearings about the september 11 attack that the u.s. consulate in libya. then the senate armed services committee confirmation hearings to lead u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan. then a national security adviser previews the upcoming trip of the president 2000 -- southeast asia. former federal reserve chairman alan greenspan and paul volcker are part of a forum on the so- called fiscal cliff, the impending budget cuts and tax increases that start in january unless congress reaches a deal. we bring that to you live, starting 8:15 on c-span 2. the house and senate intelligence committee held meetings looking into the libya. -- the attacks in libya. acting cia director and the intelligence directorate among witnesses. next we hear from house select intelligence committee ranking member, diane feinstein and the vice chairman. this is 20 minutes. accent? i think what is important about the hearing is the fact that members of the intelligence committee were able to get a lot of facts. i think what really occurred as far as benghazi was concerned, we went through a timeline. we went
services sector in europe. the city of europe someone of the e.u.'s biggest assets. and it play as crucial role in fueling the whole of the european union economy. so we will fight for rules which deliver open markets, competitiveness and new market access opportunities globally. and yes, while we support the need for greater integration within the euro zone including through a banking union, make no mistake, we will never allow banking union to compromise our fair access to the single market. so modern industrial strategy must utilize our greatest strength and that includes our financial services. second, we must support all sectors of the economy where we have a comparative advantage and that includes defense. now, i understand why some people are a bit squeamish about ministers flying off around the world to help our defense industry do deals abroad. but let me say this -- britain has the most rigorous arms export licensing regime in the whole world. and that is how it will stay. but there is a more fundamental point here. every country in our world has a right to self-defense. and you
. i will tell you here and now that is not going to happen. we will still have u.s. troops in afghanistan one year from now two years from now, five years from now. where is the press? obviously, these are not issues that the people who run on these programs today -- >> why not? >> because they do not draw an audience. what draws an audience is charlie sheen. what draws an audience is people yelling at each other. it is not enough to say these issues are important. if we actually -- i know it sounds totally idealistic, but when you and i became journalists as young men, we actually believed that we were entering, really, a special, chosen profession that meant something to a democracy. >> we called it a calling. >> a calling, exactly. >> exactly. word of honor, i never thought i was going to get rich as a journalist. you do not go into journalism to become wealthy. >> the changes we are talking about, you have already touched upon the affect it has on our society, on the business itself. value systems change. i am not saying we can ever return to the good old days. that is
are meeting to consider the nomintation of general joseph dunford, jr., to be the next commander of the u.s. forces in afghanistan and commander of the international security assistance force. this morning's meeting was originally scheduled to cinsider general john allen to be supreme allied commander. general allen currently holds the positions that general dunford is nominated. however, earlier this week, the department of defense requested general allen's hearing be put on hold pending a department of defense inspector general review. we have agreed and we hope the review can be completed promptly. general dunford is a distinguished military career with over 25 years of military service. he is truly the assistant commandant of the marine corps and has commended combat forces in iraq. general, we thank you for your many years of service and for your willingness to, once again, enter the call to serve this nation. -- answer the call to serve. let me also extend our thanks to your family whose support is so essential. as the tradition of this committee, i invite you to introduce your wife a
become the first sitting u.s. president to visit burma. he also visited thailand this weekend. today, cambodia, where he will attend a summit. in the meantime, back here in washington, congress takes a weeklong break for the thanksgiving holiday. they will come back as they ponder the fiscal cliff and how to avoid it this week. they will be back next week. lots more headlines and talk this weekend about the future of the republican party as it ponders itself. one headline says romney is digging a deeper hole for the party. we want to hear from republicans only for the first 45 minutes of its monday edition. what do you think the future of your party is, what do you stand for, and what should you stand for moving forward? here are the numbers -- ere's the "washington times" this morning, the governor of louisiana, bobby jindal. the talk continues in the party about what to romney has had to say about why he lost to the president. [video clip] >> first, governor romney is an honorable and exceptional man. i'm proud of campaign reform across the country, but i absolutely reject what he
. the u.s. is taking a lot of steps right now to right the ship. labor may be one of them. taxation may be one of them. there are some estimates that we can be energy self-sufficient in the next 30, 40 years, so maybe that helps. this is a very complex issue. it has to be resolved. there has to be a happy medium there. whether or not it is because these ceos are boring abroad for certain things or not, that is up for debate. i'm certainly not one who will take a position on that because i don't know enough about it to make that call. there are a lot of very smart people out there, who we should respect, they are very good at what they do and they are still debating about what the proper solutions to this is. all right now, this is why we're seeing such a huge amount of debate going on in d.c. and in board rooms across the country. washington, d.c. host: there have been reports that secretary geithner will play a role in these talks. guest: the economic team is in place right now. this is obviously a very critical role for the administration and for the american people as a whole. with t
messages. last year, you have a press release that said the u.s. has not seen any spillover violence. saying that when we are acknowledging that our law enforcement has been engaged in a gun battle. we have had people killed. narcotics have been caught. that is what is competing this. we need to recognize it for what it is. transnational criminal organizations -- we cannot pursue them across the international border. we will put what ever it takes to defend the sovereignty -- >> he made a point that there was a bill to fund more border patrol agents. i think it is well-known that republicans in washington do not like to spend a lot of money. his comments were that members of your own party do not want to fund this initiative. >> people are tired of blaming parties. >> that is exactly what i just said. [laughter] before you did that, you blamed republicans. [talking over each other] >> i acknowledge that president bush and president obama have increased the number of border patrol. i acknowledge that we have an increase of resources. when you have a disparity of resources in other sta
and outline the next steps i will take. as background, puerto rico has been a u.s. territory since 1898. the island is home to 3.7 million american citizens who cannot vote for president, are not represented in the senate, and elect a nonvoting member to the house. federal law is supreme in puerto rico but its residents are treated unequally under many federal programs. voters were first asked whether they want puerto rico to remain a territory. over 1.7 million people answered. which is about 75% of registered voters on the island. 54% said they did not want the current status to continue while 46% said they did. voters were then asked to express their preference among the three viable alternatives to the current status. statehood, free association and independence. over 1.3 million people chose an option. 61% voted for statehood. 33% voted for free association. and 5.5% voted for independence. in addition, 472,000 voters did not provide an answer. this marked the first time voters were directly asked whether they want puerto rico to remain a territory. one of the two main political pa
zero, is if the government deficit is big enough to more than offset the trade deficit. if the u.s. is running trade deficits on the order of 4.5% of gdp, the government deficit has to be at least 4.5% of gdp, or the private sector will fall below zero. every single time. here is the cbo forecast. this is what is projected to happen to the government deficit if we hit the cliff. this is the alternative scenario. if we hit the cliff, the projection is that the government deficit will shrink to around 2% of gdp. deficits of 2% of gdp, together with trade deficits of 4.5%, in the private sector is by definition going to be in the negative. we are going to be running a deficit. here is the same image flipped over. it is the mirror image of that. it says that if the government reduces its deficit, it is reducing the surplus to the non-government sector. you have to be able to put these things in context. why does it matter? what difference does it make if the private sector is in surplus or deficit? it turns out it makes a big difference. p the private sector budget balance is shown her
of israel, our ally. the u.s. should be bold in its condemnation of hamas and the u.s. should be bold in this continuing war by terrorist, like hamas, on civilized nations and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. blumenauer: thank you, madam speaker. perhaps one of the best parts of serving in congress is the access to our library, the library of congress, the dedicated staff at c.r.s., the magnificent reading room. the library of congress is a national treasure. and leading the library of congress is dr. james billington. he was a scholar and institutional leader before assuming leadership of the library of congress 25 years ago. as chair of the library of congress caucus, it's been a great pleasure to work with dr. billington and his outstanding staff on a variety of issues and activities for members of congress. the caucus urges you to join speaker boehner today in the rayburn room at 11:00 a.m. as he honors dr. james billington and his exemplary quarter century of l
talks about his ideas for averting the fiscal cliff, followed by a look at u.s. oil production and a new report that the international energy agency about the country's energy production by 2020. later, we will talk about how the federal bureau of investigation and the cyber- based crimes. clark sought foreign policy scholars will discuss the relationship of the u.s. with china. we will hear from the u.s. ambassador to china. our live coverage begins tomorrow at 9:15 on c-span2. >> the mindset of the world, was into the mid 1990's that wire line access would -- with stuff on poles or in the ground was the key to understanding telecommunications. the intriguing part of the wireless story is how very few people inside the industry - back- that is why the report came out the way it did. it must not just the fcc who did not understand the potential of the wireless. it was the entire industry. except for a few visionaries who were regarded as kooks. turned out to be the case was the hope that some people had that you could have a robustly competitive fixed line access industry, where a half d
. it cannot be business as usual asiran in the year it was written about the way the u.s. government organized itself at that level to deal with the reactor in syria. the bush administration organized its iraq policy in another way. there are several models out there but it is important that i ran not be seen as one of 10 or 15 problems we have to deal with on a daily basis. iran is problem number one and will be for awhile. there are plenty of other problems in the middle east. first, syria -- i concur with everything dennis said. first of all, for the longest time, many people thought the fall of assad was inevitable so we would not have to do that much to provoke it. i'm not so sure, not because i don't think this insurgency is effected. i have been on the receiving end of a number of insurgencies in my career is. this is a very powerful and effective one. iran has command -- has committed -- syria has committed powerful friends that appear to be ready to go to the mat to make sure the assad regime will stay in power. that is russia and iran. the result could be an assad that stays in power
, the environment and natural resources division, the u.s. attorney community and the many talented federal and state law enforcement agents who have worked so hard for so long to develop these cases. i would like to thank our colleagues at the securities and exchange commission for their important parallel investigation. with that i would like to turn it over now to my friend and colleague, the director of enforcement at the f.c.c. thank you. >> thank you. i'm director of enforcement at the f.c.c. today we are announcing that b.p. has agreed to pay more than a half billion dollars that it misled investigators about the rate of oil flowing during the deep water horizon disaster. the $525 million penalty represents the third largest civil penalty ever assessed and those funds will be used to compensate harmed investors for losses sustained from this fraud. b.p. misrepresented in f.c.c. filings that the oil spill flow rate was estimated to be up to 5,000 barrels of oil per day and that was the current estimate. in fact b.p. was in position of numerous analysis where 5,000 was at the lowest en
that there was a very large conspiracy, usually involving figures within the u.s. government, and a massive cover-up. >> this weekend on c-span3, 49 years later, the questions remain. lone gunman, the mob, the cia, castro. what happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy, 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> it was in 1982 that judge harold greene issued a decision which led to the breakup of the at&t corp.. that is our topic this week on the "communicators," the impact of that decision 30 years later on the telecommunications. joining us is professor roger noll of stanford, as well as professor jerry hausman of mit, both of whom were involved at various levels in the breakup or the decision to break up at&t. joining us in the washington studio is paul. professor noll, first of all, what with your activity during the breakup of at&t and what led to that decision? >> the antitrust case was formed during the johnson administration the late 1960's and a presidential task force called the telecommunications policy task force. it concluded the telecommunications industry, the part in federal
big things for the common good. i will not just represent one party. i will represent one nation. >> u.s.a.! u.s.a.! u.s.a.! >> now, as you know, throughout this campaign, president obama has tried to convince you these last four years have been a success. he's loading a plan for the next four years. he wants to take all the things he did in his first term -- the stimulus, obama-care -- and to try them all over again. look, our big dreams will not be satisfied with a small agenda that has already failed. yesterday, i imagine you heard this, yesterday president obama asked his supporters to vote for revenge. for revenge. instead, i ask the american people to vote for love of country. >> u.s.a.! u.s.a.! >> together, we have got to lead america to a better place. now, we are three days away from a fresh start. three days away from the first day of a new beginning. i have an unshakable faith in the american candidate. if anyone is worried that the last four years are the best we can do, if there are any that have feared the american dream is fading away, where and wonder whether better jobs
. >> next, the ethics of embedded >> after that a look at the changes in the u.s. senate following tuesday elections. >> recent thri museum of jewish heritage in new york city hosted a conversation on the role of embedded jurne lists. they discuss their role as journalists in iraq afghanistan and columbia. this is about 50 minutes. >> thank you for the introductions. i would like to thank you in advance. we are talking about the ethics of journalists. i am not a journalist. i am a historian. what you guys call this? do you refer to being embedded as -- how do we talk about this? >> an embed means -- you could be with the military and not be embedded. i signed a contract with the military. as far as i know, this is pretty much invented by the military and all this terminology, before that, you would just say, i am reporting with the army. >> there is an indication with embedded that you are living with them and you have shelter, food, and are with them. >> you can rely on them for food and security. we only refer to embeds as far as the military. >> it is about journalists who are working d
ramping up to 2003 the afghanistan invasion, the u.s. troops on the special groundwork special forces. it was such a small force. the issue really came up again in 2002 as people were preparing to embed in iraq. i heard about it and many of my peers already in the field thought, no way, we will not do that. our impression of the 1991 embeds is that they were stuck in a room and could not get anything done. a lot of us chose not to embed and many of us went to iraq into the north. i would say we were shocked and appalled at how much play the embedded reporters were getting. there were good stories being reported. they were reported well. it worked so well i felt like i was worried news organizations would start just sending embeds and not reporting the other side. class with the security system, a basically became like that. with iraq, it got to the point where you could not be in unilateral anymore. in afghanistan, that is typical. >> that is the term for non-embedded. unilateralist. >> you are unilateral. >> what was important for me in the iraq war was working for the l.a. times we
to train. specialist nelson is just one of 60 -- 60 u.s. service members who have been killed this year by the afghans that they were sent to train. i don't know where the outrage is by the united states congress. i am very disappointed in both parties, their leadership to allow our young men and women to stay in a war that has no end to it, makes no sense to the american people. in fact, mr. speaker, the american people have said time after time, poll after poll that they want to bring our troops home now, not 2014 but now. on october 7, there was a national article written and the title was "a mother mourns a grim milestone," referring to the 2,000 american casualties from the afghan war. lisa freeman, who was interviewed in the article, who lost her son, captain matthew freeman, in 2009, he was shot by a sniper in afghanistan, ms. freeman said, i just sat here reliving the pain and wondering , where is america's outrage? where is america's concern that we're still at war? and mr. speaker, i made reference to this yesterday. the october 14 "new york times" editorial, and the title, "t
lost more than 40% of their wealth from 2007 to 2010. nearly one in six u.s. residents is officially poor, the highest rate in 50 years. 22% of american children live in poverty. we're facing an economic situation that resembles the years leading up to the great depression. now, this prevailing budget plan calls for deep cuts, environmental protection, social security, medicare, medicaid. well, corporations and the top 1% get tax cuts of nearly $3 trillion over the next decade. this is not how you protect a democracy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. poe: mr. speaker, the -- a president has finally given us his balanced plan to allegedly avoid the fiscal cliff. he wants to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion. he wants another stimulus package of $50 billion. he wants the authority to raise the debt ceiling without asking congress for approval. say it isn't so, mr. speaker.
will continue to watch that story for u.s. well. part of the mix to avoid the fiscal cliff is these jobless benefits. that is the headline in the politics and policy section of "the washington post." "over 2 million americans could lose their jobless benefits before the end of the year." host: susan, michigan, what do you think? should we cut medicare and social security? caller: absolutely not. absolutely not. host: why not? caller: i am a woman who has finally reached the age of social security. all the years the work, this money was taken out of my paycheck. i was told from a very young age that when i reached a fine age of the period where you retire and you can get social security, that all the money that i paid in would be refunded to me. this money is not to be touched, not to be changed. for my generation, or the generations that are coming after i am gone, to mess with social security is absolutely a travesty. it should never, ever retouched. host: president obama, meeting with labor leaders today, as well as other liberal groups, and also planning to meet with business leaders. he
>> tonight, anthony kennedy talks about preserving the u.s. constitution followed by the history of the presidential appointment process. anthony kennedy talks about protecting and preserving the u.s. constitution. from the heritage foundation, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen. it is great for me to be able to join john in welcoming new year to this lecture. this is the fifth annual occasion on which we have had this lecture. the heritage foundation vision is to build an america where freedom, opportunity, prosperity, and civil society flourished. to help achieve this vision, the center launched the preserve the constitution series, which is an annual lecture series to inform and -- inform citizens on topics related to this constitution. the series promotes the protection of individual liberties, property rights, free enterprise, constitutional limits on government. we've been able to feature some of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight'
and democratic attorney general. one of our two u.s. senators was an independent, elected twice. an independent missed winning the governorship by 15,000 votes over a million passed in 1973. we were the ticket splitting capital of america. we have cents settled back into partisan voting with the rest of america. this is a very polarized era. having said that, when you have close elections you still have a band of voters who will mix and match on the ballot, either because they want to mix and match or they are simply reacting to the individual candidates. in the case of romney and kaine, i have personally been in situations where straw votes were taken among large groups and you generally find you have 3, 4, 5% of the romney boaters picking tim kane for various reasons. some of these romney voters are more moderate republicans and the like tim kane better than his opponent. are there similar voters for obama and george allen? i am sure there are. i never met one of them. but i will say this -- george allen, despite what happened in 2006, he has won from time to time in running for statewide off
is a distinguished former advisor -- current advisor to many government agencies, u.s. leaders and diplomats, and he is a prolific and best-selling author. let me quote from the top of his web site at the university of maryland where he is the anwar sadat professor of peace. "i have always believed good scholarship can be relevant and cons consequential for public policy. it is possible to affect public policy without being an advocate. to be passionate about peace without losing analytical power. to be moved by what is just while conceding that no one has a monopoly on justice." i think our other scholars and our world affairs council college shares that sentiment. jinan reed is a associate professor of sociology and health at duke university, she's a carnegie scholar and an associate director. she is half libyan, spent much of her childhood in libya, and thanks to the arab spring she has had a touching and moving reunion with her father after many, many years. i owe you great thanks for a zesty presentation two months ago, and of course, we won't go into it, but i also owe you dinner. professor ma
forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that experience -- could havi annan led the group to see if they can re-establish something similar and this report of which has not been very much observed. i think we have ideas for iran. that will give really intrusive inspections. it will give the right for the international community to go where there is concern. not where iran is declaring. but then to pay for that is to lift the sanctions. and then we can have an outcome. and let the iranian people take care of it. it's not for the outside to do the regime change. >> thank you. we'll ta
, and commitment each of them so courageously demonstrated. i am pleased that the u.s. house of representatives is acting to pass this legislation to name the u.s. office in cocoa in honor of harry t. and harriette moore. passage of house resolution 2338 will further honor the achievements and sacrifices of the moores. leaders and first martyrs of our nation's modern civil rights era. designating the united states post office at 600 florida avenue in cocoa as the harry t. and harriette moore post office will demonstrate their legacy in a town where mr. moore began his service to others. this will serve as a constant reminder to our community of the important and lasting contributions the moores made to cocoa and the nation. i urge my colleagues to join me in passing this legislation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes mr. clay. mr. clay: mr. speaker, let me thank and congratulate my good friend from florida, there posey, for bringing-mr. posey, for bringing to this house, bringing to our attention these two great americans and legacy they left this country. and thank yo
americans. i'm proud of the meaningful work we have achieved with our dam and levees, u.s. port security, chemical facility security, cybersecurity, criminal justice reform, immigration reform, national security, human trafficking, bringing in government spending and other issues that came before the congress. we wish to thank the volunteers and supporters who were buy our side and your support is gratifying and humbling and we are immensely grateful, god bless you and god bless this land of ours. i read that to suggest the feelings that i have at this time when i am approaching the end of my service in this house. and one of the thoughts i have as i do that is the question of civility in this house, in the congress, in the political dialogue and the country at large. if one examines the history of the house of representatives, one understands immediately that we are governed not by roberts rules of order but by jefferson's manual, the manual authored by thomas jefferson. and if you analyze the spirit and the letter of that manual, you will find that president jefferson believed that vig
in the u.s. economy for you? it makes no sense. they go away and compete against us rather than innovating and creating jobs here. then i took a closer look at what the republicans are actually proposing. they haven't turned the corner at all. in fact, they haven't even stepped out of their houses. they certainly didn't learn anything from the last election. the stem visa bill on the house floor this week was actually voted down in september. it was introduced with a few changes and no consultation with democrats. i want to find a bipartisan solution on immigration. i'm committed to it. i know it won't be easy. they say a journey of 1,000 miles begins with just one step. the problem is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to take one step and have the democrats travel the other 999.9 miles. certainly this bill isn't even a step it's a shell game. it's the same problem that the stem bill in september had. it holds visa from a legal immigration program that works over to a new visa category where there may or may not be sufficient demand to use those visas each year. immigration
issue. we've been working on more on a state by state basis within wind stream. the u.s.t.a. has been involved in that on how we might help there but i think we've got a lot of work to do there. >> what about whit comes to mobile broad band is that included in the access america plan? >> it is. i think that one of the mobile brondsband going to play a big role as some of the large companies has rolled out services. the latest 4 g is improving the broad band capabilities. but i think fundamentally everybody i think miss a couple of points here often and that is without a land line connection there is no wireless because it's all going back to the public switch telephone network. so we have to pay attention to both types of infrastructure and around fissics i think of mobility is going to be a complementary service. it's not going to be a replace of employment for broad band. more and more people are off loading from their wired access and it's because of things like spectrum limitations. so for that to work in concert i think of mobility and wired access as complementary. >> so much of
the panel and we'll see you the reception. >> next a look at the changes in the u.s. senate following tuesday elections. then the president obama obama and speaker bainer and then the polling during the 2012 presidential campaign. >> tomorrow president obama will be at arlington national cemetery to participate in the ceremony at the tom of the unknown and a remembrance ceremony. live coverage begins at 11:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we solve our debt reform. i'm proposing we avert the fiscal cliff and 2013 is finally the year our government comes to grips with the problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise and new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the new elected congress starts in january but the congress has to do work in a lame duck session and they have to work on the federal deficit raising the debt ceil
as he continues to that 2014 deadline for u.s. troops out of the afghanistan. the ceremonies get under way later this morning we'll have live coverage at 11:00 eastern here on c-span. washington journal continues on this sunday november 11. we'll be back in a moment. >> some patients require special therapy, hip knows sis is effect nive certain types of battle northeast rose sis f. >> now you're deep asleep. we're going back now, going back to -- one of the most important procedures is group psychotherapy. here under the psych tryst guidance the patient lerns to understand something of the basis causes of his distress. >> i'd like to see if we can get some illustrations about how one's personal safety would stem from childhood safety. if i had done anything wrong afseshamed of i would tell them what i had done so i kept it to myself. >> this weekend on c-span 3 let there be light. his world war ii dk meantry on combat trauma and treatment. today at 4 p.m. eastern. >> i want my fiction to be intensely journalistic because unless you get out and look at what is going on these days, you'r
on a trip to the gulf. members offered glages to president obama on winning the u.s. presidential election. other questions focused on the british economy, cuts within the health service, and relations in the united states. this is about 35 minutes. >> order. questions for the prime minister. mr. ian wright. >> number one, mr. speaker,. >> mr. speaker, i've been asked to reply, the house will know my right honorable friend the prime minister is on the official overseas visit to the middle east. mr. speaker, the whole house will wish to join and contribute to the two british soldiers that were killed in afghanistan last week. lieutenant edward baxter and lance corporal of first battalion royal gurkha rifles. our heartfelt condolences to the family and friends of the brave servicemen. any particularly poignant we force all. we will once again are reminded of the remarkable job our armed forces do to ensure our safety and security. >> for the more the house will wish to join me in paying tribute to david black the officer shot and killed last friday. that's why right honorable friend the seco
or a back door in the system. again, let me just try to catch up. that is the u.s. government excluding the intelligence community. let us presume, and i do not know the number, i do not want to know the number, let us presume those other top 17 agencies in the intelligence community are having an equal number of attempted intrusions. add another 45,000 to these -- 90,000 incidents per year. that is roughly one attempted intrusion every five minutes. state,, let's add local, tribal governments. in that vast pool we call the private sector, private industry -- the numbers go through the roof, even conservatively. i am leading toward an understanding that cyber attacks and intrusions are kind of a continuum. they're happening all the time. going at all the different sectors. now again, from that gao report, if you look at the types of intrusions being reported, you have in this pie chart here, 31% of the incidents reported are still under investigation. something happened, something abnormal. we got a warning somebody tried to get in or a computer system crashes and we try to repeat it an
the time about what we are going to find wasteful spending. this is a chart, the u.s. debt clock, and viewers can see it, you can look into the cameras with viewers. the u.s. national debt, $16 trillion and counting. also, as you look at that, you look at $3.5 trillion in spending this last fiscal year. you talk about programs you can cut, but it is clear the three biggest drivers are medicare, social security, and defense, six out of 10 federal dollars. what are the tough choices that you are willing to make when it comes to prioritizing cuts in benefits or defense, because it is clear that the only three areas you can make substantive differences, and for the tea party, the people who put you in office, state how you would make the tough choices. where do you cut? >> you included the overseas contingency operations. now we are now out of iraq, that does not count. my opponent said he would not support. cut the defense budget over the next 10 years. it is the sequestration that i am against. 62% of the budget is net interest on the debt. one of the things, stop with a payroll ta
talked about putting the dollar at risk. put in the credit rating of the u.s. at risk. is there really a compelling argument within congress? the dollar, after all -- when there is a crisis abroad, it is the first place people move into. the reserve currency around the world. is that hovering over these negotiations or that anxious about the markets? has that been dispensed with? >> i think it is hovering over this. there is a more immediate prod, the reality that will confront every member of congress. these tax cuts from the bush era are all going to expire. the sequester, $1.20 trillion across-the-board cuts. that is in law. the doctors who treat medicare -- the alternative minimum tax will grow from affecting 4 million-5 million people to affecting 30 million people. the doctors who treat medicare patients are going to face a 28% cut. these are not somebody's imaginings. these things are all in law. they are going to happen. there is a debt limit the session -- that will have to be -- debt limit extension that will have to be addressed. >> that could extend these things. >> they
, see that as a stabilizing function. at the end of the day when you have the capacity as u.s. military for power protection as well. that is a global capability, but that means their respective of choices that are made by other powers, we want the ability to sustain our presence in the asia-pacific, same is true around the globe. as you look at these different areas, i think there are terrific opportunities to engage with china on each of them. and to finally ask the question and try to answer the question the secretary clinton has been encased in for quite some time and that is, can we get a better answer than we physically had in the past to how a new rising power comes into the international system? in other words, can we do so without running significant risks or falling into conflict? >> thank you. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary said. in fact, the admiral locklear _ those points the other day in australia, talking about the engagement in that strategic trust again. it is interesting the chinese tend to look at the american asia-pacific pivot as a sort of containment
in the u.s. senate to pass important legislation, including the grand rudman deficit law. those issues remain important today. he did not aspire to be a politician. he did not have to like one. he cared deeply. we know he cared deeply about our country and devoted himself because he had a calling to shape and preserve our country's future. he believed deeply in the rule of law and used the force of his intellect to defend it. one of the things that is most telling about warren rudman is the statement that represents what he was all about. he once said -- i consider myself an american first and a republican second, fiercely independent, and totally committed to the common good. he had the carriage of his convictions and stood for what he believed in. in bidding farewell to to the senate in 1992, he expressed gratitude for the opportunity to serve in the senate which talented colleagues. many are here today to speak about their experiences with him. he expressed his hopes for the future of the senate, saying it is a special place with special people. i hope in the coming years that the i
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